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Surgical Conditions

  • Abdominal enlargement is not an unusual occurrence. It can be due to a simple increase in intra abdominal fat due to weight gain but this is only one cause.

  • Almost all tumours of adipose tissue (fat) are slow-growing and benign. They are called lipomas. The tumours are usually permanently cured by full surgical removal.

  • Anal furunculosis is also called perianal fistula or perianal sinus. It is a condition affecting the German Shepherd Dog more than any other breed in Australia.

  • Anal gland (sac) disease is very common in dogs. The sacs frequently become impacted, probably due to blocking of the ducts.

  • This tumour is a disordered and purposeless overgrowth of cells originating from the modified sweat glands of an anal sac.

  • A haematoma is a large blood blister which results from rupture of a small blood vessel with resulting haemorrhage between the skin and cartilage usually on the inner aspect of the ear.

  • Haematoma is a localised collection of blood, usually clotted and can occur anywhere in the body. Bruises can be considered a form of haematoma.

  • This slow-growing tumour is a disordered overgrowth of cells of the skin epidermis. It gets its name from its resemblance under the microscope to the basal cell layer of epithelium.

  • The names for the non-cancerous fibrous growths include collagenous hamartoma, fibroepithelial polyp, skin tag, cutaneous tag, hyperplastic or hypertrophic scar and acrochordon. A hamartoma is defined as a nodular, poorly circumscribed focus of redundant tissue.

  • This is any tumour originating from the mammary gland tissues. Most tumours of this type are cured by total surgical removal but a few progress to malignancy in time and start to spread to other parts of the body (metastasis).